Wednesday, September 20th, 2017 08:44 am
"Blake and Mortimer" is one of the most well-known Belgian comics series, created by Edgar P. Jacobs (1904-1987). The title is a bit of a misnomer due to phonetic issues - the titular character is, in fact, Philip Mortimer, a British scientist. He is aided by his "heterosexual life partner" (a common feature in Belgian comics at the time, and the inspiration for many a slash fanfic) capt. Francis Blake of the MI5. The book mixes detective and spy elements with fantastic concepts such as UFOs, time travel and Atlantis.

I was going to post my first contact with their books, "The Necklace Affair", but thought it best to start with the most famous story of all, "The Yellow 'M'" - the one with the most iconic cover of the series, copied by various comic book artists.



Verbosity ensues )

"Blake and Mortimer" were recently (wow, actually, about a decade ago or so) translated by Cinebook Ltd., a British company who specializes in Belgian and French comics, which gives an interesting twist to a comic set in Britain with two protagonists from Albion.
Wednesday, September 20th, 2017 10:19 am
Detailed images of the upcoming Code Geass figurine have been revealed by Megahouse. It is based on the illustration create by CLAMP a few years ago for the anime box set.









[More images are at this blog.]
Wednesday, September 20th, 2017 09:17 am


NHK's Cardcaptor Sakura Clear Card Arc anime website is up with a new promotional image of Sakura. The anime will start January 7th, 2018. A PV will broadcast this Friday, Sept 22.
Tuesday, September 19th, 2017 11:09 pm
The revengers in it're the Roto.

The revenged upon're the Paznina.

Issue #2 opened on a flashback to the inciting incident.

It was a response. )
Tuesday, September 19th, 2017 10:41 pm


Let's see if I can get this new origin straight...

Read more... )
Tuesday, September 19th, 2017 09:13 pm
And Jason 1.0

Saw some original art from this issue online and realisd I'd always meant to share the issue. It's a minor story in many ways, Doug Moench writing the first of a sort of two part story which isn't major or "important", but to share Don Newton pencils with Alfredo Alcala inks and Adrienne Roy colours, is always a pleasure.

371 00.jpg

First up, that cover )
Tuesday, September 19th, 2017 07:01 pm

⌈ Secret Post #3912 ⌋

Warning: Some secrets are NOT worksafe and may contain SPOILERS.

01.


More! )


Notes:

Secrets Left to Post: 01 pages, 24 secrets from Secret Submission Post #560.
Secrets Not Posted: [ 0 - broken links ], [ 0 - not!secrets ], [ 0 - not!fandom ], [ 0 - too big ], [ 0 - repeat ].
Current Secret Submissions Post: here.
Suggestions, comments, and concerns should go here.
Wednesday, September 20th, 2017 12:22 am


One of the things I wanted to originally go for with this series was to create a kind of “myth from the future”—a science-fiction quest based on the classical Argonauts/Prometheus model. One of the cornerstones of that was the idea that some meaningful number would venture forth and one less would come back. Someone pays the price for stealing fire from Heaven, and there’s no shortage of likely candidates… -- Al Ewing

Read more... )
Tuesday, September 19th, 2017 11:57 pm


I want some Kite Man action figures. When you squeeze his legs he sighs resignedly. Hell yeah! -- Tom King

Read more... )
Tuesday, September 19th, 2017 09:30 am
Lucky Luke is a humorous European comic series which serves as both a parody and an homage to the Westerns. Created by Belgian cartoonist Maurice De Bevere ("Morris", 1923-2001) in 1946, it was published as serials in several magazines (Spirou, Tintin, Pilóte, etc). When René Goscinny of Asterix fame took over co-writing duties, it raised the magazine's overall quality of text and made it a hit.

In the stories, cowboy Lucky Luke usually acts as a bodyguard to someone who will serve as the conductive thread of the narrative. The gags and mishaps will follow on until the objective is fulfilled at the end of the story.

It also used plenty of historical figures in its stories, such as Hanging Judge Roy Bean in the following book.



11 pages out of 48, below )

Don Rosa also featured Judge Bean in a story of his own, "The Prisoner of White Agony Creek".